Themes - 27 septembre 2010

fr - US Catholic Bishops on Immigration

Historical Grounding

Since its founding, the United States has received immigrants from around the world who have found opportunity and safe haven in a new land. The labor, values, and beliefs of immigrants from throughout the world have transformed the United States from a loose group of colonies into one of the leading democracies in the world today.
-U.S. Catholic Bishops, “Strangers No Longer : Together on the Journey of Hope,” 2003, #17
 
Catholic teaching has a long and rich tradition in defending the right to migrate. Based on the life and teachings of Jesus, the Church’s teaching has provided the basis for the development of basic principles regarding the right to migrate for those attempting to exercise their God-given human rights. Catholic teaching also states that the root causes of migration–poverty, injustice, religious intolerance, armed conflicts–must be addressed so that migrants can remain in their homeland and support their families.
- U.S. Catholic Bishops, “Strangers No Longer : Together on the Journey of Hope,” 2003, #28
 
In the current condition of the world, in which global poverty and persecution are rampant, the presumption is that persons must migrate in order to support and protect themselves and that nations who are able to receive them should do so whenever possible. It is through this lens that we assess the current migration reality between the United States and Mexico.
- U.S. Catholic Bishops, “Strangers No Longer : Together on the Journey of Hope,” 2003, #39
 
Our concern as pastors for the dignity and rights of migrants extends to pastoral responses as well as public policy issues. The Church in our two countries [United States and Mexico] is constantly challenged to see the face of Christ, crucified and risen, in the stranger. The whole Church is challenged to live the experience of the disciples on the road to Emmaus (Lk 24:13-25), as they are converted to be witnesses of the Risen Lord after they welcome him as a stranger. Faith in the presence of Christ in the migrant leads to a conversion of mind and heart, which leads to a renewed spirit of communion and to the building of structures of solidarity to accompany the migrant.
- U.S. Catholic Bishops, “Strangers No Longer : Together on the Journey of Hope,” 2003, # 40

 

Human Dignity and Human Rights
Human dignity is respected and the common good is fostered only if human rights are protected and basic responsibilities are met. Every human being has a right to life, the fundamental right that makes all other rights possible, and a right to access to those things required for human decency—food and shelter, education and employment, health care and housing, freedom of religion and family life.
- U.S. Catholic Bishops, “Forming Consciences for Faithful Citizenship :
 A Call to Political Responsibility,” 2007, # 49
- U.S. Catholic Bishops, “Strangers No Longer : Together on the Journey of Hope,” 2003, # 38